Can old be pretty?

Yes, it totally can.

I was putting on my makeup this morning, rubbing primer into my laugh lines and wondering why I couldn’t get it to fill them up a little better, and then I realised. I like my laugh lines.

Sure, there are other things I don’t love about my eyes – they tend to disappear when I smile properly, I have blue bags that seem impervious to all make-up, and I’ve got milia that never went away. But none of those things have anything to do with my aging face – I’ve always had those issues.

In fact, I have a couple of lines now that appear around my cheeks when I smile, and I love them – they’re like the dimples I never had when I was all plump-cheeked and youthful. Age is actually doing me a favour for once.

So, in celebration of this realisation, I’m sharing some images that remind you of exactly how beautiful age can be.

Here’s Audrey Hepburn aged 59

I love how her face appears more triangular than it did when she was in her 20s, she’s more elegant, her eyebrows are more expressive, and now that she’s got those lines next to her mouth, she looks like she knows some wise and wicked secret.

Catherine Keneer has never looked better (here aged 55) – she’s an advertisement for the appreciation of laugh lines, they have framed her face. She’s always been beautiful, but now her face is one of those that you can’t help but smile back at, even when you look at her on a screen.

 

And below, we have Jaclyn Smith, apparently aged 61 in this shot – you have to agree, the last few decades have not made her any less beautiful.  Then there’s J-Lo at 47 – so damn sexy now, oozing confidence and I’m loving the way her cheeks have hollowed in her forties.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m not saying these actresses haven’t had any surgery. All I’d like to point out is that the marks of age that you can see on them are far from ugly. Remember that when you curse your wrinkles and make an appointment for fillers. And I’d also like you to think about the word “old” – personally I wonder why we put such a finite word on something that is still progressing. I’ll be old when I’m not aging anymore, thanks – when I’m no longer around to hear you refer to me that way.

 

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